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Rosie Scribble

Skinny mummies

I used to be a skinny mummy, which would not have been a problem if I'd be healthy. There's nothing wrong with being naturally thin, but my thinness was not natural or healthy. Now I'm 'normal' and healthy and life is so much better. There is nothing better than becoming a mother to make you put your life in perspective and work out what is important and what is not. Being a positive role model to an influential daughter was important, being thin was not. So life has changed, and thank goodness it has.

So it saddens me to see mothers like Victoria Beckham, and the other too-thin celebrities out there, paying such close attention to what they eat and how they look. Size really is not everything. I lost so many years in pursuit of thinness and it's sad to see them wasting their time too, quite literally. Life is just too short.

Victoria_beckham 
Source: People.com

It isn't fun being hungry and underweight, and it's actually far from attractive. If it doesn't ruin your health and your looks now, then it will in the end.

Children need healthy role models who have a normal relationships with food. They don't need to see that mummy doesn't eat very much because it's important to be thin. Children copy us, they do as we do, not as we say. If I don't eat a healthy balanced diet, I can't expect my six-year-old too. I've learnt that from experience.

Surely these days we are worth more than are our physical appearance? We work, we run homes, we are driven and ambitious, and we have a voice. We don't need to appear thin and helpless to serve a purpose in life.

Come on girls, eat up! Life is for living, don't waste it!

19 comments… add one
  • Have you turned into Mika?

  • I absolutely couldn’t agree more. I feel really sorry for young girls nowadays, they have so much pressure on them to be stick thin, preferably with porn star boobs. The view on how a woman should look has become so distorted, it really saddens me.

  • Ian, damn right I have, and I’m singing it loud!
    VBH, thank you for your more sensible comment! It is a shame there is so much pressure on young girls these days. It is, quite frankly, wrong.

  • I completely agree – teaching our daughters a good relationship with food and respect for themselves and their bodies is so important, especially when becomming a WAG seems to be the career choice of so many teenagers

  • Insomniac Mummy

    I have terrible self esteem. Just last night I was thinking that I need to remedy this fixation I have with striving for an inattaiable idea of perfection.
    I am not thin, by any measure, and to be healthy for my kids I need to lose weight and get fit, but I also need to do it in a away that teaches them to be healthy, happy and self confident about themselves. I never want them to feel like I do.
    It’s not easy, but I want to try.

  • Whistlejacket

    I keep waiting for the day when being this stick thin is suddenly untrendy and people in the public eye pile on some pounds again. Sadly I don’t think it’s going to happen, not while size 0 is celebrated on the catwalk. I once read an interesting article on what the long-term health prospects for women like Victoria Beckham are likely to be. I think they’re high contenders for osteoporosis among other things. It’s tricky for us striking a balance between making our children aware of healthy eating and encouraging them to have a good appetite and enjoy food.

  • Liz

    I totally agree – I’ve met a lot of skinny celebs and they’re so thin it actually makes you wince. I think Posh has got over her Lollipop phase but there are so many other celeb mums disappearing before our eyes… it’s sad.

  • I find the whole thin mummy thing so sad. A fab friend of mine is a fantastic mother, but worries so much about her daughter’s weight that she has stopped letting her have second helpings. The daughter is four-and-a-half years old, has just started school and is growing almost as you watch. So she’s hungry, but because fab friend got such grief from her own mother about the importance of remaining thin, she’s now in danger of repeating the pattern with her own daughter. It makes me so sad, and I worry, but know I wouldn’t be thanked for my comments. But thank you for highlighting this issue, and hopefully we’ll all bring up happy, healthy children, in mind as well as in body.

  • I find the whole thing so completely terrifying – I just can’t imagine how girls can grow up with anything even approaching a healthy body image in today’s society.
    I try and protect Flea as much as I can – but I do worry about it.
    I have a friend with a 15-year-old daughter who is binge eating, putting on weight, and desperately unhappy – and my friend is terrified about what to do – do you mention it, not mention it, offer to help, restrict food intake, go to the gym or not go to the gym?
    Such a minefield but I think you’re right – all we can do is be healthy and try and be a good example.

  • You know how I feel about this Rosie. As someone who’s had food issues all my life I’m so scared that my kids will develop an equally unhealthy relationship. Except they won’t, because I have mates like you around to ground me, as well as a brain, a growing sense of self worth and experience. Hugs. xx

  • As you saw yesterday, I have no issues with eating!

  • So true. I saw an article recently in which Cindy Crawford said she never eats even one french fry when she takes her kids to McDonalds. Great role model.

  • Oh wow, thank you really interesting post – and such a contrast to my experience of being a fattie and having it would seem ore support/help in dealing with weight “issues” at that end of the scale.
    Where has your blog been all my life? Love it.
    Good evening, Good Afternoon and Good Day to you. x

  • Well said Rosie.
    I’m glad I have sons because there is less pressure on them to conform to an airbrushed ideal of beauty. Although sadly I think it’s only a matter of time before boys are targeted by the ridiculous fashion industry.
    It upsets me to see young girls whose only ambition in life is to be a WAG or a ‘celebrity’. Grr!

  • Thanks to everyone for their comments. I was going to plan individually but then the comments kept on coming, which is great. Thanks for taking the time to comment on a subject I feel very passionately about.

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